The modernization of family law usually leads to better solutions for families, but it has also created confusion in some cases. Many people who have heard about older rules regarding divorce and family law may mistakenly apply those outdated assumptions to their current situation.

For example, there was once a time when a spouse who wanted to divorce their partner would have to have grounds to request a divorce or be able to prove fault in a court of law. Do you still have to prove fault in order to seek a divorce in Pennsylvania?

Pennsylvania allows and even encourages no-fault divorce proceedings

Divorces comprise a significant portion of family courts cases on any given day. As such, any effort that can streamline divorce and reduce the burden on the courts will benefit not only the individual seeking the help of the family law system but also those who work for it.

Proving fault or divorcing for cause typically requires substantial testimony and evidence. That means divorce proceedings will take much longer if you want to blame your ex than they will if you simply file for a no-fault divorce. In a no-fault divorce, the person filing asserts that there has been a significant breakdown of the marital union and that they don’t expect the relationship to recover.

You don’t need to prove anything in order to make such a claim. Instead, your divorce proceedings will focus primarily on splitting your possessions and handling custody of any children you share. With very limited exceptions, most couples will benefit from a no-fault filing because it makes for a faster and cheaper divorce. Discussing your situation with a lawyer can give you a better idea of whether a fault-based divorce would be necessary or beneficial in your case.